Doom Abuse: The ultimate The Faint record?

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Doom Abuse, The Faint’s sixth album, took way too long to come out. Considering that The Faint ceased to be somewhere in the six years since their last album (2008’s Fasciination) was released it’s a miracle that fans are even holding a copy of Doom Abuse in their hands. But speaking of the album you should almost be holding in your hands by now (Vinyl copies are out now, available on CD and digitally April 8th), it is by and large well worth the wait. The sound of a band reinvigorated  and taking stock of what made them great in the first place but branching out into unknown territory at the same time, Doom Abuse grabs hold of everything that made The Faint unique in the past and fuses it with something even more futuristic and awesome. Worth the wait? Eff yes!

Mildly teased at the end of 2012 with the 10th anniversary Danse Macabre tour that heralded the “Evil Voices” 12″ (The sinister “Unseen Hand” has been slightly retooled to fit in here while “Evil Voices” remains mostly intact), Doom Abuse is finally here and it is easily the best, most fun, and most cohesive album The Faint has concocted thus far.

This is an album that was made to be danced to from the opening dischordant squeal of “Help In The Head” through to the synth fade out on “Damage Control”. The Faint live is this infectious moving beast that compels the audience to follow suit and dance like maniacs. Doom Abuse is a great soundtrack to that through and through. There’s the punk rock rabble rousings from Fasciination (“Salt My Doom”, “Scapegoat”), Danse Macabre throwbacks (“Lessons From The Darkness”) and some things that are completely new (“Mental Radio” is a Gary Numan meets The Cure amalgamation while “Dress Code” goes for Freedom Of Choice-era Devo).

In other words, Doom Abuse has *ahem* something for everybody.

At the end of the day, this was the album The Faint needed to make after their hiatus. Todd Fink is at the top of his game on every track (Especially on the quintessential “Loss Of Head”), Dapose is a sonic maelstrom throughout as well while Jacob Thiele creates these epic synthetic soundscapes (“Animal Needs”) and Clark Baechle just keeps the beat alive incessantly.

Doom Abuse is out now as a Deluxe Double Vinyl Edition and out on April 8th in CD and digital formats.

 

 

Trackbacks

  1. […] 2014 was the year that electronics totally owned me or I totally gave myself up to electronic music. I’m still not sure yet. Either way, whether it was new discoveries like Mr. Kitty or Trust or Skinny Puppy ruling the live scene, electronic music simply owned my life this year. One of my favorite electronic bands also happened to drop a bombshell of an album this year seemingly out of nowhere. The Faint quietly reconvened in 2012 for the Danse Macabre tour and an EP of all new music and then…nothing. That nothing turned out to be this year’s Doom Abuse which was released in April. Taking the best parts of all of their previous albums and infusing their sound with an urgency not heard in some time, The Faint is more alive now then ever before. For our review, head on over here. […]

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